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22

Apr

futurejournalismproject:

Navigate the News
The Upshot, a new, data-driven venture from the New York Times, launches April 22. It will cover politics, policy and economic analysis, Quartz reported in March, and added:

David Leonhardt, the Times’ former Washington bureau chief, who is in charge of The Upshot, told Quartz that the new venture will have a dedicated staff of 15, including three full-time graphic journalists, and is on track for a launch this spring. “The idea behind the name is, we are trying to help readers get to the essence of issues and understand them in a contextual and conversational way,” Leonhardt says. “Obviously, we will be using data a lot to do that, not because data is some secret code, but because it’s a particularly effective way, when used in moderate doses, of explaining reality to people.”

Today, Leonhardt explained the why of it on Facebook:

You have no shortage of excellent news sources — sources that expertly report and analyze news as it happens. Like you, those of us at The Upshot rely on those sources every day. So why are we starting a new site to help people understand the news?…
…One, we believe many people don’t understand the news as well as they would like. They want to grasp big, complicated stories — Obamacare, inequality, political campaigns, the real-estate and stock markets — so well that they can explain the whys and hows of those stories to their friends, relatives and colleagues.
We believe we can help readers get to that level of understanding by writing in a direct, plain-spoken way, the same voice we might use when writing an email to a friend. We’ll be conversational without being dumbed down. We will build on the excellent journalism The New York Times is already producing, by helping readers make connections among different stories and understand how those stories fit together.

Image: @UpshotNYT announces its launch.

futurejournalismproject:

Navigate the News

The Upshot, a new, data-driven venture from the New York Times, launches April 22. It will cover politics, policy and economic analysis, Quartz reported in March, and added:

David Leonhardt, the Times’ former Washington bureau chief, who is in charge of The Upshot, told Quartz that the new venture will have a dedicated staff of 15, including three full-time graphic journalists, and is on track for a launch this spring. “The idea behind the name is, we are trying to help readers get to the essence of issues and understand them in a contextual and conversational way,” Leonhardt says. “Obviously, we will be using data a lot to do that, not because data is some secret code, but because it’s a particularly effective way, when used in moderate doses, of explaining reality to people.”

Today, Leonhardt explained the why of it on Facebook:

You have no shortage of excellent news sources — sources that expertly report and analyze news as it happens. Like you, those of us at The Upshot rely on those sources every day. So why are we starting a new site to help people understand the news?…

…One, we believe many people don’t understand the news as well as they would like. They want to grasp big, complicated stories — Obamacare, inequality, political campaigns, the real-estate and stock markets — so well that they can explain the whys and hows of those stories to their friends, relatives and colleagues.

We believe we can help readers get to that level of understanding by writing in a direct, plain-spoken way, the same voice we might use when writing an email to a friend. We’ll be conversational without being dumbed down. We will build on the excellent journalism The New York Times is already producing, by helping readers make connections among different stories and understand how those stories fit together.

Image: @UpshotNYT announces its launch.

fastcompany:

Robonaut, installed on the International Space Station to perform chores for astronauts, just got its first pair of real legs.

NASA says that the new seven-jointed legs are designed for climbing in zero gravity and offer a considerable nine-foot leg span. Instead of feet, the legs feature “end effectors” designed to grapple onto handrails and sockets located both inside the space station and, eventually, on the ISS’s exterior. Robonaut’s end effectors have a built-in vision system—almost like a pair of eyes—that are designed to eventually automate each limb’s approaching and grasping.

Read More>

fastcompany:

Robonaut, installed on the International Space Station to perform chores for astronauts, just got its first pair of real legs.

NASA says that the new seven-jointed legs are designed for climbing in zero gravity and offer a considerable nine-foot leg span. Instead of feet, the legs feature “end effectors” designed to grapple onto handrails and sockets located both inside the space station and, eventually, on the ISS’s exterior. Robonaut’s end effectors have a built-in vision system—almost like a pair of eyes—that are designed to eventually automate each limb’s approaching and grasping.

Read More>

Celebrate Earth Day with Green Media and Bloggers

prnewswire:

image

In honor of Earth Day, we’re highlighting environmental bloggers and media on Beyond Bylines:

     

Check out our Q&A with Mother Nature Network’s Matt Crenshaw for his thoughts on the future of the green movement and environmental media.

       

And then learn more about TreeHugger, Dot Earth, and these other green blogs we love.

     

(Image by NASA/JPL-Caltech on Flickr; used under CC by 2.0)

17

Apr

yahoonews:

Check out this amazing footage of the Hexapod Robot.  It moves like an animal but, yes, it’s a machine — and it’s a vision of the not-so-distant future of technology, robotics, and everyday life.

iOS 8 Feature Requests

nerdology:

I usually write this post closer to WWDC, but iOS 7 is in need of a lot of work so I’m posting early. I’m not even going to request defaults for email, browser, and maps. There’s no point dwelling on things that are never, ever going to happen. Let’s jump in.

- Shake to Undo
Really? You’re still here? My iOS 5 request list asked if there was a better, cleaner way to handle undo and yet, it’s still hanging around. There HAS to be a better way than shaking the phone to deal with undo. But maybe not? It’s been in iOS for so long I’m almost convinced there’s no better way. Almost.

- Smarter About Pausing Music
Sometimes the volume should be just lowered not totally stop. If I’m listening to music and then I quickly want to record a video of something. My music doesn’t need to turn completely off and remain off until I launch into the Music App again and hit play. Apple can be smarter about that.

- New Multitasking
I wrote about this a few weeks ago. I think having access to your dock in the multitasking screen would be awesome.

image

- Folders
Folders have become abysmal in iOS 7. Only 9 items on screen at a time? And you can actually trap apps on their own page without knowing it. I never particularly liked the old folders, but some kind of hybrid of old folders with pages is a great place to start.

- Lock Screen
We should be interacting more with the lock screen. The lock screen as it is now seems too much like it’s been hacked together from what the original lock screen was and made to work as notifications became more important. It needs to be rebuilt from the ground up.

  • I should be able to reply to a text message from the lock screen. 
  • I should be able to launch into the dock apps from the lock screen (much the way TouchWiz and Sense work). That way from lock screen and from multitasking you can always get to your most important apps.
  • We don’t need a clock to take up 1/3 of the lock screen.
  • Notifications that are outdated should go away. My transit app displays that there were delays on the 6 train this morning, even after it’s been corrected.

- Touch ID
Open up Touch ID so it can manage passwords on websites or within apps. I have to type in a ridiculous password every time I need to go into my banks app. Would love to bypass that with my fingerprint.

I would bet 1000 dollars that this is coming in IOS 8. It’s the natural iteration of Touch ID and a way for people to get excited about it. Especially since it’s very likely that more devices are going to get Touch ID this year. Expect it in all new iPhones and iPads in the fall.

Read More

16

Apr

prweek:

Cardstore launched a Mother’s Day video on Monday after conducting a series of video interviews for a director of operations position, which offered no pay, no time to sleep, and other extreme conditions. In the video, which has garnered more than seven million views in three days, the brand suggests, “This Mother’s Day, you might want to make her a card.”

hellofromtumblr:

Discover Trending Blogs
Tap the magnifying glass in our mobile apps to find and follow the awesome blogs that are currently trending on Tumblr.
Download for iPhone and iPad Download for Android

hellofromtumblr:

Discover Trending Blogs

Tap the magnifying glass in our mobile apps to find and follow the awesome blogs that are currently trending on Tumblr.

Download for iPhone and iPad Download for Android

15

Apr

fastcompany:

Watch How Google X Employees Deal With Failure

An inside look at the inner-workings of Google’s top-secret research lab.

Google X isn’t like most R&D labs. In this month’s featureFast Company was granted first-of-its kind access into Google’s top-secret research laboratory, where “moonshots” trump real-world feasibility, and failure is openly encouraged. “If we can get to a no quickly on an idea, that’s almost as good as getting to a yes,” says Rich DeVaul, head of Google X’s Rapid Evaluation team in the video above. Hit play to watch what happens when the very active imaginations of some very smart people are given free rein to fail.

14

Apr

smarterplanet:

New IBM Services Target Security And Disaster Recovery | TechCrunch
IBM has seen the technology world changing as much as any other vendor and that’s part of the reason it bought SoftLayer last year –to broaden its cloud offerings. Today, the company has built upon that, announcing new security and disaster recovery services that could make the cloud more attractive to companies that remain skeptical.
One area the cloud excels in is disaster recovery because it stores your applications and data outside your data center. When a weather event, fire or other disaster strikes, your data is protected in the cloud and your operations can go on.
And that’s the idea behind IBM’s Cloud Virtualized Server Recovery (VSR), which will keep virtualized instances of your most critical applications and data in the SoftLayer cloud, regardless of whether your services are run primarily in SoftLayer or in your own data center or private cloud. As IBM, pointed out, downtime is expensive and if you have a virtualized cloud insurance policy, you could keep going even while your center was in tatters.

smarterplanet:

New IBM Services Target Security And Disaster Recovery | TechCrunch

IBM has seen the technology world changing as much as any other vendor and that’s part of the reason it bought SoftLayer last year –to broaden its cloud offerings. Today, the company has built upon that, announcing new security and disaster recovery services that could make the cloud more attractive to companies that remain skeptical.

One area the cloud excels in is disaster recovery because it stores your applications and data outside your data center. When a weather event, fire or other disaster strikes, your data is protected in the cloud and your operations can go on.

And that’s the idea behind IBM’s Cloud Virtualized Server Recovery (VSR), which will keep virtualized instances of your most critical applications and data in the SoftLayer cloud, regardless of whether your services are run primarily in SoftLayer or in your own data center or private cloud. As IBM, pointed out, downtime is expensive and if you have a virtualized cloud insurance policy, you could keep going even while your center was in tatters.

thisistheverge:

Samsung Galaxy S5 review The next big thing is a lot of little things

thisistheverge:

Samsung Galaxy S5 review
The next big thing is a lot of little things